Monday, September 21, 2015

Kathy Najimy, get down with your bad ass self.

Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on September 21st. The General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.

Given that it's the 70th anniversary of the UN, it's almost criminal how not close to peace we are this year.

Ok, here's another mashup to start your day - this time Bruno Mars is providing the background track (Uptown Funk) for 100 Movies (see how many you can identify.)

Watch it a second time to appreciate how wonderfully this is edited together.

Do you remember the 21st Night of September?

Remember the true love we share today

Two giants of animation sharing the same birthday:

September 21, 1912 -
Chuck Jones
, animator and director of Warner Brothers cartoons Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, was born on this date.

Chuck was close friends with both, Theodor Geisel (Dr. Seuss) and Ray Bradbury.

September 21, 1920 -
Jay Ward
, cartoonist (Rocky & his Friends, Bullwinkle), was born on this date.

Jay drove a sound-truck across the U.S. to gather signatures for a Statehood for Moosylvania campaign, and then tried to storm the White House with them, right at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis.

September 21, 1968 -
The police drama ADAM 12, premiered on NBC-TV on this date.

In keeping with the reputation of Jack Webb's series being scrupulously accurate about police procedures, select episodes of this series were used in police academies as instructional films.

September 21, 1975 -
Sidney Lumet's
amazing film, Dog Day Afternoon, starring Al Pacino and John Cazale, premiered on this date.

The entire film is mostly improvised, though around the script. After rehearsing the script for weeks with his cast, Sidney Lumet took the improvisations that were made while rehearsing and made that the official screenplay.

September 21, 1957 -
Perry Mason starring our favorite nipple rouge wearing actor, Raymond Burr, premiered on CBS-TV on this date.

During the series' original run, Raymond Burr was accosted in public by a woman who demanded to know: "How come you never lose?" To which Burr dead-panned: "Madam, you only see the cases that I try on Saturdays."

September 21, 1993 -
The police drama NYPD Blue, premiered on ABC-TV on this date.

Dennis Franz (Detective Andy Sipowicz) is the only cast member to stay with the series throughout its entire run and the only actor to appear in all 261 episodes.

Today in History:
September 21, 1327
Former King Edward II had a particularly painful end on this date.

Edward had been overthrown by his wife, Isabella and her lover, Roger Mortimer. Edward had pissed off Isabella royally for among other things, sleeping with men. Isabella and Mortimer had Edward II imprisoned, after his abdication in favor of his son, Edward III.

It was rumored that Edward had been killed by the insertion of a piece of copper into his rectum (later a red-hot iron rod, as in the supposed murder of Edmund Ironside - King Edmund II was murdered in a lavatory; stabbed in the bowels when he sat down to relieve himself). Murder in this manner would have appeared a natural death, as a metal tube would have been inserted into the anus first, thus allowing the iron rod to penetrate the entrails without leaving a burn on the buttocks.

As I have said in the past, sometimes it is NOT good to be the king.

September 21, 1897 -
The New York Sun ran its famous editorial that answered a question from 8-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon: "Is there a Santa Claus?"on this date.

Obviously, times were different back then given that The New York Sun was printing an editorial about Christmas in September.

September 21, 1915 -
With a winning bid of  £6,600, Mr. Cecil Chubb purchases Stonehenge and 30 acres of land at auction. He donates the monument to the British state three years later.

He donated the monument because he could not figure out how to reset Stonehenge correctly.

September 21, 1937 -
George Allen & Unwin, Ltd. of London published the first edition of  J. R. R. Tolkien's novel The Hobbit on this date. It was illustrated with many black-and-white drawings by Tolkien himself.

The original printing was only a 1,500 run and sold out by December due to enthusiastic reviews.

September 21, 1975 -
Self-proclaimed revolutionary Sara Jane Moore attempted to kill President Gerald Ford as he walked from a San Francisco hotel on this date.

A bullet she fired slightly wounded a man in the crowd but once again President Ford walks away unscathed.

September 21, 1981 -
On August 19 1981, President Reagan, who had pledged during the 1980 presidential campaign to appoint the first woman to the Supreme Court, nominated  Sandra Day O'Connor as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, replacing the retiring Potter Stewart. Ms. O'Connor was confirmed by the Senate 99-0 on this date and took her seat September 25.

In her first year on the Court, O'Connor received over sixty thousand letters from the public, more than any other justice in history.

September 21, 1983 -
In a speech to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce on this date, Interior Secretary James G. Watt jokingly described a special advisory panel as consisting of 'a black ... a woman, two Jews and a cripple.'

Although Watt apologized, he later resigned .


And so it goes.

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